Blam UK condemns the recent anti-Black language racism from UK white-owned media outlets

Blam UK condemns the recent articles by a range of white-owned media companies that further entrench language discrimination and the erasure of Black British English speakers in British society. The British media has a long history in shaping racist, discriminatory and anti-Black racial discourse. The highlighted articles make repeated, unfounded statements about Black British EnglishContinue reading “Blam UK condemns the recent anti-Black language racism from UK white-owned media outlets”

The mental health impact of the policing of Black British English

By Christina Idowu Black British English (BBE) is a distinct language that directly connects us to our ancestors, who created and used their own language as a form of cultural resistance. Using elements of African and Caribbean languages, such as Pidgin and Patois, and Black-British vernacular to those who speak it and those who feelContinue reading “The mental health impact of the policing of Black British English”

The UK’s Very Own Refreshing and Upbeat Genre…GRIME

By Christivie Manga Grime tracks tell a story of Black urban youth experiences growing up in London Origins of Grime Grime is a genre of uniquely Black and British electronic rap/hip-hop music that emerged in East London in the early 2000s. Grime is known to be rapid, syncopated breakbeats, generally around 140 beats per minute,Continue reading “The UK’s Very Own Refreshing and Upbeat Genre…GRIME”

Diving Into the History of the Legendary Jamaican Sound System

by Christivie Manga Fun fact: Did you know sound systems were invented in Jamaica? Sound systems are one of the most overlooked aspects of Black-British music despite being a commercial success story of immense proportions! Sound System: Defined A sound system is the combination of microphones, signal processors, amplifiers, and loudspeakers in enclosures all controlledContinue reading “Diving Into the History of the Legendary Jamaican Sound System”

Notes in time: Retracing the influence of Black British musicians in the 15th-19th centuries.

By Sophia Harberd For centuries Black people have been shaping the popular music scene in Britain. By the 15th century, Black music traditions were being carried en masse with the African diaspora over the 400-year period when swathes of Africans were stolen and brought across the Atlantic into the ‘New World’. This population of theContinue reading Notes in time: Retracing the influence of Black British musicians in the 15th-19th centuries.

Reflections on Child Q

“Until the revolution come and all the feds start runnin’” Noname Last week, it became publicly known that a 15-year-old Black girl, known as ‘Child Q’, was the victim of state-sanctioned sexual assault and racist gendered policing, which were a violation of her human rights. We as a collective are enraged, traumatised, and deeply dispiritedContinue reading “Reflections on Child Q”

Child Q: Statement from BLAM UK

Last week, it became publicly known that a 15-year-old Black girl, known as ‘Child Q’, was the victim of state-sanctioned sexual assault and racist gendered policing, which were a violation of her human rights. We as a collective are enraged, traumatised, and deeply dispirited to learn that this had happened to Child Q. As an organisation that works with schools to abolish current systems and introduce transformative justice and BlackCrit practices and thinking, we have seen first-hand what happens when radical and transformative practices do not exist in a school. This is seen in the egregious failures that led to Child Q’s unlawful strip search.

In the 36 page report by the City & Hackney Safeguarding Children Partnership (CHSCP), we read how she was adultified, subjected to misogynoir, racially profiled, and criminalised by her teachers, school, the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), and the State.